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Author Topic: Advice for Buster  (Read 2214 times)

helshaw

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Advice for Buster
« on: September 27, 2015, 07:03:59 PM »

Haven't posted on here for a long time. Buster was diagnosed with Addisons in Nov 13 along with IMHA in Feb 13. His Addisons has been stable for a long time now but unfortunately his blood test on Mon showed some concern. I am afraid I don't know what the levels were as I didn't wait for the results as they were going to run them the next day so I rang up for them. Buster is on 2 tablets in a morning & they told me to increase it by half, we are then to return in a fortnight. It wasn't my usual vet that knows Buster & he was asking me the usual questions about any changes which I said no to. It wasn't until we got home that I remembered he had been drinking a bit more than usual. This didn't seem to affect him but since our visit to the vets, when he is left at home we come home to a flood. I leave Buster at 8.30 and am at home for lunch at 12.30. I leave puppy pads down & these are soaking. I have another dog but I'm sure its not him as I haven't noticed him drinking loads & when he was a pup he would never go on the puppy pads. I am concerned that it could be something more than his addisons. My vets are great & will definitely be seeing my usual vet but in the mean time just wondered if anyone had any advice.
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Catherine

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Re: Advice for Buster
« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2015, 08:17:06 PM »

You really need to find out what blood tests the vet did and the results. The increased drinking and peeing could be anything from a urinary tract infection to kidney problems. It could also be Cushings, may even be he is having trouble with his thyroid. Does he have any other symptoms - weight loss/gain, eating less/more, hair loss, slowing down....?
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helshaw

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Re: Advice for Buster
« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2015, 08:47:34 PM »

Sorry, wasn't to clear in what i wrote. The blood tests were his routine ones to check his pcv levels for his imha and one to check his potassium & sodium levels for his addisons. They werent happy with his sodium level but dont know what the level was. He is a typical cocker, greedy which is a good sign as when he is off his food you know he is poorly. He has slowed down but he is now 11, still enjoys a wwalk. Cushings entered my head but didnt know whether you could have Cushings & Addisons. Will try & spk to my usual vet nxt week.
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Jo CIMDA

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Re: Advice for Buster
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2015, 08:14:08 PM »

Hi

An Addisonian dog can get iatrogenic Cushing's if the medication is too high or if you are giving unnecessary daily pred.  This can cause excessive drinking and weeing.  It might be worth taking a urine sample to be tested for bacteria.

Jo

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Lovemedogs

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Re: Advice for Buster
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2015, 12:05:12 PM »

A dog that has been diagnosed with Addison's will not become a Cushing's dog as it cannot produce its own cortisol any more. You cannot have both at the same time as they are contraindicative. It may, as Jo has commented, have Cushing's symptoms if having too much pred. On the other hand, a dog with Cushing's can become Addisonian and some are pushed over to become Addisonian when having problems controlling the Cushing's. These dogs can revert back to become just Cushing's dogs again.

Many people will tell you that dogs with Addison's are much easier to manage than dogs with Cushing's in terms of treatment.

Pam
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Jo CIMDA

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Re: Advice for Buster
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2015, 09:35:31 AM »


Many people will tell you that dogs with Addison's are much easier to manage than dogs with Cushing's in terms of treatment.

Hi

I have personal experience of managing a dog with Primary Cushing's and confirm that this is true. 

Drug induced Cushing's is simply resolved by lowering the dose of drug.  However, when a dog is receiving immunosuppressive doses of prednisolone to treat a life threatening AI disease the side effects of iatrogenic Cushing's is a trade off and as the dose of pred is reduced the symptoms of Cushing's subside.

Jo
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